Keep your Greek: Coming to a store near you!

30 09 2009

Readers of this blog may remember my series of posts in January called Keep your Greek.

I’m delighted to report that Zondervan has recently agreed to publish a book by the same title, drawing on the principles I outlined in those posts.

I’ll be expanding the posted material, adding new stuff, and will need to think creatively about how to really help students, pastors, et al, to keep their Greek skills long term amidst the busyness of life.

I’ll keep you posted about new developments, but for now I am keen to hear from you. Lots of the comments on the original posts were helpful, and I want more! Please share your tips, your own experiences (positive or negative), and any ideas you might have for this book. I’d love to hear from you, and will acknowledge your ideas as appropriate.

Thanks.

Posted by Con Campbell


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9 responses

30 09 2009
Shane

Hi Con
good news re Zondervan.

I would say help me to find and use a good bible tool like Accordance.

what I mean is, I need to have some knowledge of the greek, but not to the same level that I think my lecturers in new testament greek thought I needed.

it may sound a little pragmatic, but I would use greek more if I had the equipment like accordance to cut out the stuff that puts novices like me off.
so in keeping greek, I need to keep the right tools in my belt.

trust that helps

Shane

30 09 2009
Zondervan Academic

We’re excited to work with you again, Con! Cheers!
–Andrew

30 09 2009
redpooba

Professor,
This is absolutely wonderful news. I bet I have this conversation on my campus 5x everyday encouraging and impressing upon my brothers the need to know our languages so that we may better know God’s word. I have found one of the most encouraging things is showing them the practical benefits of knowing the languages God used. Showing how the flow of a discourse reading is far superior than trying to exegete a single verse, phrase, or even worse a single word. The benefits and joy of reading a whole pericope, chapter, and best the whole book in the original is worth every hour of study.
Thank you for your work, I will be sure to have your book in my bookstore as soon as it is released.

redpooba

30 09 2009
Laura

YAY!

🙂

17 10 2009
Dave Clancey

Hi Con
Good news indeed about the book. Personally, I’ve found loneliness and isolation are significant factors in letting my greek slip. In the busyness and neverending list of things to do in the pastorate, particulalry when you’re on your own, it’s very easy to move quickly through the Greek, and over time for it to slip. And becuase no one in the parish sees or appreciates or encourages you in having the original languages (although they certainly see and notice when you don’t do other, more public aspects of ministry!) it’s very easy to let the urgent overtake the important and for the Greek to languish. I’m not implynig that if you’re in a staff team it’s easy to keep going with the Greek, but I do imagine that if you have another brother alongside you who also wants to keep their Greek going, it may be a help – iron sharpening iron and all that. Thanks again.
Dave

21 10 2009
Matt

Con,
I just started working in a church after MA work and am amazed at how little I “need” to use my languages. One of the things that keeps me at it is the blogosphere – especially the Koinonia blogs by Bill Mounce. Another is my connection with professional societies, like ETS. Keeping in contact with people who are using the languages is a constant reminder for me to keep with it.
Glad to see that there will be a resource like this available!

21 10 2009
Zondervan Academic

We’ve started a little contest around Con’s Keep Your Greek posts, check it out here: http://www.koinoniablog.net/2009/10/campbell.html

Help him write the book and win a free copy!

–Andrew

21 10 2009
Fred Haltom

Con,
While pastoring immediately after school, I determined to translate one sentence from the Greek NT every morning. At first I used whatever tools I had in my study, and sometimes became very frustrated how slow it went. In my younger years I was a runner. I woke early every day and ran. And like any disciplined activity, the benefits were not apparent at first. But continued persistence always pays off in the long run. For six years pastoring, I keep up the morning translation ritual. My love for God’s word motivated me and I became very proficient in sight reading from the GNT. I later was offered a teaching position because of this proficiency. I’ve been teaching Greek for 30 years now and I owe it all to small beginnings.

23 10 2009
Con Campbell

Good thoughts. Yes, regular use is vital. And I’m starting to think that using Greek in community is key too. We might have to develop some web-community forum type things for Keep your Greek. Stay tuned!

Con




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